Brake Master Cylinder Replacement at your home or office

Our mobile technicians offer services 7 days a week. Upfront and transparent pricing.

Get an upfront price

$135.30 – $888.81

Price range for all vehicles

Sale!
$888.81 $135.30

How much does Brake Master Cylinder Replacement cost?

It depends on the type of car you drive and the auto repair shop you go to. Our mechanics are mobile, which means they don’t have the overhead that repair shops have. They provide you convenience by coming to your home or office.

The Average Replacement Cost If you have a brake master cylinder that goes bad, the average cost to replace the cylinder will be between $320 and $500. The cost of the part itself will only be around $100 to $210. But the biggest expense of the replacement job will be in the labor costs, which are around $230 to $300. If you were to be knowledgeable in vehicles and braking systems, then you would be able to save a fortune on the labor costs by doing it yourself. However, it is a job that requires you to be a professional mechanic or else you may mess something up.

Brake Master Cylinder Replacement Service

What is the brake master cylinder and how does it work?

The brake master cylinder has a piston that pressurizes fluid in the brake lines to each wheel cylinder as you apply force to the brake pedal. That pressure moves the pistons that are in the wheel cylinders. As the pistons in those wheel cylinders move, they force the brake pads or shoes tightly against the rotors or drums allowing the car to stop quickly. The size of the pistons in the master cylinder and in the wheel cylinders are carefully selected when designing a car. This allows drivers to apply moderate pressure on the brake pedal when stopping, but creates tremendous pressure applied at the wheel cylinders. A car can then stop quickly even at high speeds. Depending on how much force is applied to the brake pedal, the pressure in a car’s brake lines will typically be in the range of 800 PSI to 2,000 PSI.

When to replace the master cylinder?

  • External fluid leaks. There should be no fluid visible on the external surfaces of any portion of the master cylinder or the plastic fluid reservoir.
  • Low, slowly falling, or spongy brake pedal. Faulty internal seals on the piston can cause internal leaks and also seepage of brake fluid into the power assist brake booster. Internal leaks will typically be accompanied by a low pedal, a spongy brake pedal, or a pedal that slowly sinks as you maintain pressure. In all cases, you will experience reduced braking abilities.
  • Discolored brake fluid. No brake fluids, other than those specified for the year, make, and model, are fully compatible with a car’s internal rubber seals in the master cylinder.
  • Discoloration of brake fluid can also occur due to moisture and particulate contaminants in the fluid.
  • Warning lights on the dash. If the brake system warning light illuminates, there are several potential causes but failure of the master cylinder is in the list of causes that would have to be investigated.
  • 5 Symptoms of a Bad Brake Master Cylinder

    When you step on the brake pedal in a vehicle to slow it down, its braking system uses a brake master cylinder to convert the pressure you place on the pedal into hydraulic pressure. The conversion of the pressure takes place because the brake master cylinder transfers brake fluid to the braking circuit as you step on the brake pedal. The brake master cylinder will do this no matter if your vehicle is using disc brakes or drum brakes. There is no way any braking system could exist without a brake master cylinder. Once the brake master cylinder starts to go bad, there will be certain noticeable symptoms that will arise. Below are the top 5 symptoms of a bad brake master cylinder that you will surely notice.
  • Warning Light – The first symptom that is the easiest to notice is when the Brake Warning Light illuminates on the dashboard. This indicates that there is some kind of problem with the braking system, so it might not necessarily mean that the brake master cylinder is at fault. But if the braking system sensors detect the brake fluid pressure is dropping, it will likely be due to a bad brake master cylinder. This will result in the warning light coming on.
  • Leaky Brake Fluid – The brake master cylinder needs a certain level of braking fluid to create the hydraulic pressure necessary for slowing down the vehicle. If the brake master cylinder is leaking braking fluid or if there are unsecured reservoirs on the cylinder which are holding the fluid, then you will have a low brake fluid level for sure. This will impair your ability to slow down the vehicle. You would need to replace the brake master cylinder in this situation.
  • Spongy Brake Pedal – When the brake pedal starts to feel spongy as you place pressure on it with your foot, this will automatically be a sign that your brake master cylinder is having issues. The cylinder contains rubber seals which keep the brake fluid inside of it. If these rubber seals were to get worn out or damaged, then there’d be an internal brake fluid leak. The result of this would be a spongy feeling in the brake pedal.
  • Contaminated Brake Fluid – Another problem that could happen as a result of worn out rubber seals is contamination in the brake fluid. The seals not only help keep the brake fluid from coming out, they also prevent dirt and debris from mixing with the brake fluid. If this were to happen, the brake pressure would not be as strong as you step on the brake pedal. You’d probably end up pressing down harder on the pedal just to get the vehicle to slow down like normal.
  • Sinking Brake Pedal – Following all these other symptoms, you will start noticing the brake pedal not returning to the top after you’ve removed your foot from it. Instead, it will slowly sink to the floor. This could become a real driving hazard, so you’ll want to fix the brake master cylinder right away at this point.
  • How do mechanics replace the brake master cylinder?

  • On vehicles with power brakes, the master cylinder is bolted to the metal housing of the power brake booster. There is usually an electrical plug connecting to a brake fluid level sensor on the master cylinder reservoir and that plug must be disconnected.
  • Once all steel brake lines are disconnected from the master cylinder, the master cylinder is unbolted from the brake booster and removed from the vehicle.
  • The new master cylinder must be bench-bled to expel air from internal passages that contain the piston. Then the new master cylinder is bolted to the brake booster and the brake lines are reattached. The electrical plug for the fluid level sensor is reconnected.
  • Whenever a new master cylinder is installed, brakes lines to wheel positions must be bled to remove air, old fluid and contaminants. If your vehicle is equipped with anti-lock brakes, the mechanic may use a bidirectional scan tool during brake bleeding to actuate the ABS pump, thus ensuring that all air is removed from the complex valving in the ABS system.
  • All brake line connections that were removed during the master cylinder replacement are inspected for any leakage and the vehicle is road tested to ensure normal operation of the brakes.
  • Is it safe to drive with a master cylinder problem?

    No, any fault in the master cylinder, which is part of the braking system creates a safety risk. A fully operational brake system is essential to quickly stopping your car. Driving a vehicle isn’t safe, if the master cylinder is leaking or has other faults, as braking distances might be longer than normal. The braking system on a vehicle is among the most important safety systems and must be fully functional to safely drive your vehicle.

    When replacing the master cylinder keep in mind:

  • The master cylinder is only one component of many in a vehicle’s braking system. During replacement of the master cylinder, all vehicle braking system components should be inspected to ensure maximum braking power is available. The amount of friction material remaining on the brake pads and brake shoes should be verified.
  • Brake lines and flexible rubber hoses at each wheel position should be inspected for corrosion and deterioration. The power brake booster should be evaluated to ensure that power assist is working properly.